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Frank26:  What is shorter ……. Less Delays …….. A Straight Line or a Crooked one?
Aggiedad77:  Here’s my two cookie thought
Less delays are better
a Straight Line…..I’m thinking is a Long Line

a Crooked Line…..is that line that Maliki heads….definitely not the line you want to be in
Less Delays is what the Holy Man wants…..I’m wanting what he wants….because he usually gets what he seeks
Aloha   Randy
Backdoc: THERE SEEMS TO BE A NEW NARRATIVE TODAY ABOUT OIL AND THE DOLLAR DECOUPLING EVEN THOUGH WE SEE A HUGE OVERSUPPLY ON OIL!
WITH TPP BEING SIGNED TOMORROW THEY BETTER GET ON WITH IT SOON BECAUSE OIL WILL RISE BASED ON THESE CONTRACTS GOING FORWARD AND IT SHOULD BE POSSIBLE FOR CHINA TO DEPEG FROM THE DOLLAR NOW AS WELL AS POSSIBLY THE SA RIAL.
A LOT SEEMS TO BE COMING TOGETHER FOR SURE ON A MACRO PICTURE. TONIGHT I MIGHT GET TIME TO SHARE MORE ON THE BANKING STRUGGLES IN EUROPE.
GOOD JOB GUYS, AND THANKS TO WS FOR SOME GREAT ARTICLES TODAY.
DOC   IMO
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Dnari131:  Bloomberg: Dollar Suffers Worst Day in 7 Years as Traders Face Fed Reality
Lananh Nguyen
February 3, 2016 —
The dollar is having a rough ride.
The U.S. currency fell the most in seven years against its major counterparts after a report showed service industries expanded in January at the slowest pace since 2014, fanning concern that economic growth is cooling. Currency traders are catching up to the bond market, where 10-year yields sank to the lowest in a year Wednesday, while futures are sending the strongest signal yet that traders expect the Fed to stand pat this year.
“The currencies market has been at odds with the rates market, and now the rates market is winning,” said Peter Gorra, head of foreign-exchange trading in New York at BNP Paribas SA. “There’s a disconnect where the Fed says it’s four hikes while the market says it’s like 0.7 hike this year — someone is wrong.”
Concern about a global demand slump and policy makers’ response to a slowing growth worldwide has put the $5.3 trillion-a-day market in disarray. The dollar’s pullback this week has reversed all the yen’s decline against the greenback on Friday when Bank of Japan introduced negative interest rates to revive inflation, which is stuck near zero.
The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index, which tracks the U.S. currency against 10 global peers, slumped 1.8 percent as of 1:43 p.m. in New York. The dollar slid 2.3 percent to 117.23 yen, erasing all the gains since the Bank of Japan’s surprise Jan. 29 move to negative interest rates on certain deposits.
The greenback fell 1.8 percent to $1.1118 per euro , after sinking to the lowest since October.
The bond market’s balance tipped toward zero rate hikes this year. Futures show traders expect the Fed’s effective rate to reach 0.495 percent by year-end. That level is closer to the current effective overnight rate of 0.38 percent than it is to 0.625 percent, where it may stand if the central bank raises its target range by a quarter-point again, following liftoff from near zero in December.
The January employment report on Feb. 5 may determine whether the dollar selloff will continue. The payroll data will show the U.S. created fewer than 200,000 jobs for the first time since September, according to economists surveyed by Bloomberg.
“Presumably investors are betting that lingering risk-off will stay Fed’s hand when it comes to further tightening,” said Valentin Marinov, head of Group-of-10 currency strategist at Credit Agricole SA’s corporate and investment banking unit in London. “It would take disappointing U.S. data today and Friday to see the dollar coming under sustained selling pressure.”
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/ … ic-outlook