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Xyz:   An international report confirms corruption worth billions of dollars ​during the rule of al-Maliki http://translate.google.com/translate?depth=2&hl=en&sl=ar&tl=en&u=http ​://www.kitabate.com/index.php%3Fpage%3Darticle%26id%3D70008
Xyz: DEVELOPING NEWS … (*) Parliament vote on the legal and amnesty of th​e Federal Court the middle of this month https://translate.google.com/translate?depth=1&hl=en&prev=search&sl=ar ​&u=http://aynaliraqnews.com/index.php%3Faa%3Dnews%26id22%3D52631
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Bluehendu:  Debt, defaults, and devaluations: why this market crash is like nothing we’ve seen before

A pernicious cycle of collapsing commodities, corporate defaults, and currency wars loomover the global economy. Can anything stop it from unravelling?
By Mehreen Khan, graphic by Tom Shiel
A global recession is on the way. This truism of economics holds at any point in which the world is not in the grips of a contraction.
The real question is always when and how deep the upcoming downturn will be.
“The crash will come, but it would be nice if it came two years from now”, Thomas Thygesen, head of economics at SEB told over 200 commodity investors and analysts in London last month.
His audience was rapt with unusual attention. They could be forgiven for thinking the slump had not already arrived.
Commodity prices have crashed by two thirds since their peaks in 2014. Oil has borne the brunt of the sell-off, suffering the worst price collapse in modern history. Brent crude has fallen from $115 a barrel in the summer of 2014, to just $27.70 in mid-January.
We are in a very unusual situation where market sentiment is of a different nature to anything we’ve seen before
Thomas Thygesen
Plenty of investors sitting in the blue-lit, cavernous surrounds of Bloomberg’s London HQ would have had their fingers burnt by the price capitulation
“They tell you should start your presentations with a joke, but making jokes at a commodities seminar is hardly appropriate these days,” Thygesen told his nervous audience.
Major oil price falls have a number of historical precedents. Today’s glutted oil market is often compared to the crash of 1986, the last major episode over global over-supply. Back in the late 90s, a barrel of Brent crude fell to as low as $10 in the wake of the Asian financial crisis.
A perfect storm
But is the current oil price collapse really like anything the world economy has ever experienced?
For many market watchers, a confluence of factors – led by oil, but encompassing China, the emerging world, and financial markets – are all brewing to create a perfect storm in a global economy that has barely come to terms with the Great Recession.
“We are in a very unusual situation where market sentiment is of a different nature to anything we’ve seen before,” says Thygesen.
Unlike previous pre-recessionary eras, the current sell-off has seen commodity prices, equities and credit conditions all move in dangerous lockstep.
Although a 75pc oil price collapse should represent an unmitigated positive for the world’s fuel thirsty consumers, the sheer scale of the price rout is already imperiling the finances of producer nations from Nigeria to Azerbaijan, and is now threatening to unleash a wave of bankruptcies across corporate America.
It is the prospect of this vicious feedback loop – where low oil prices create financial tail risks that spill over into the real economy – which could now propel the world into a “full blown crisis” adds Thygesen.
So will it materialise?
Read More at:  http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/economics/12138466/when-is-the-next-financial-crash-coming-oil-prices-markets-recession.html